Vancouver, WA Scavenger Hunt

Find your Couve!

Situated north of weird and south of Sound, Vancouver, Washington is where being in between feels just right. The city’s roots originated on the Columbia River’s north shore, where the Pacific Northwest’s first indigenous inhabitants started a diverse and thriving community. Now that growth presents itself in our innovative waterfront, friendly and walkable downtown, and easy access to the outdoors.

We may be close to everything, but we’re far from typical. Come discover the unique sights and sounds of Vancouver by finding these nine key spots that tell our story. Find all nine by March 31, 2022 to be entered to win a prize!

*Walking to the locations (except Vancouver Lake) is about five miles. Driving to all nine locations is about 16 miles and takes 2-3 hours to complete the scavenger hunt. Check in when you arrive at a location and look around for clues to answer the trivia question—you never know what you might learn!

Click here to see what’s included!

Vancouver, WA Scavenger Hunt

  • Mobile exclusive
  • Instantly delivered via text and email
  • No apps to download

How this Pass Works

Step 1 - Get Your Pass

This mobile exclusive passport is a collection of historical locations for you to explore, discover and learn about during your visit.

Step 2 - Receive Text

Your passport will be instantly delivered to your phone via text and email and is ready to use immediately! There is no app to download. Your pass can be saved to your phone’s home screen for easy one-tap access.

Step 3 - Redeem

When visiting a designated location, simply check in using your phone's built in GPS and answer the optional trivia questions for a chance to win a prize!

Included Venues

See locations on an interactive map.

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Ilchee Statue & Plaza
Vancouver's story begins on the north shore of the Columbia River, which led the area's first inhabitants here. Ilchee, or "Moon Woman," was the daughter of powerful Chinook Chief Comcomly, the “one-eyed chief” of the Chinook tribe. The plaza she kneels in is meant to honor the Chinook people, who lived on the land from the mouth of the Columbia inland for thousands of years. She looks west over the Columbia River, toward her family’s ancestral home at Chinook Point on the Washington coast.
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Fort Vancouver
The historic birthplace of the modern Pacific Northwest, Fort Vancouver was deemed the "only desired situation for settlement west of the Rocky Mountains" in the early 19th century. The area became home to a diverse population in a cosmopolitan village that served as the headquarters for the London-based Hudson's Bay Company. Plan a visit to the reconstructed Fort to see costumed reenactors in the Fur Store, the Blacksmith Shop, the Bake House, and more. (Open Tues.-Sat. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; $10 entrance fee, 15 & under are free)
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Pearson Air Museum
One of the nation's oldest working airports, Pearson Field's sprawling runway landed the first aerial crossing of the Columbia River in the early 1900s, and is the only airport in the U.S. that functions adjacent to and partially within the boundaries of a national historic reserve. From its roots as a military air field, to its history as the site of a Spruce Mill and its transformation into a civilian field, Pearson Air Museum helps provide a detailed look into the golden age of aviation in Vancouver. (Open Tues.-Sat. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; free to visit)
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Esther Short Park
This five-acre square in the heart of downtown Vancouver is the oldest public park in the Northwest, dating back to 1853. Find the 69-foot Salmon Run Bell Tower in the southeast corner, which includes a glockenspiel diorama that emerges occasionally to tell the story of the Chinook Indians and bells that chime every hour. Esther Short Park, named after the "Pioneer Mother" of the city (a statue of her can be found on the north edge of the square), hosts several annual events and festivals throughout the year.
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Kiggins Theatre
The only historic theater still operating in Vancouver, Kiggins Theatre has been a community gathering place and a classic icon on downtown's Main Street since 1936. Named after entrepreneur and former mayor J.P. Kiggins, the theater's first film cost 23 cents on opening night. Find the 13-foot-tall "Movie Madness" art installation across the street to learn more. Find showtimes and events on the theater's website.
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Clark County Historical Museum
Constructed from "Hidden bricks" (those made from the Hidden Brick Company established in 1871), the building that is now the Clark County Historical Museum has had other uses before becoming a place of preservation, collections, and artifacts. Rotating exhibits share an understanding of Clark County's past to help build a better future. (Open Thurs.-Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; $5 for adults, $3 for youth ages 5-18)
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Vancouver Lake
As a city in the Pacific Northwest, the outdoors is in our DNA. Regionally close to Mount St. Helens, the Columbia River Gorge, and the Pacific Coast, you don't have to go far to breathe in the trees. Find Vancouver Lake just five miles from downtown for a serene setting perfect for a picnic, woodsy stroll, or evening paddle. You can even see three mountain peaks on a clear day from the water. Find an info board along the paved path to learn more fun facts.
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Vancouver Community Library
The Vancouver Community Library is a symbol of the city's family-friendly atmosphere and accessible nature. You can't miss the lime green "LIBRARY" letters in the front—follow the building's windowed wall to the side to find a sculpture garden along a slanted walkway. Want to explore inside? Visit daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
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Grant Street Pier
Return to the waterfront where the most modern development lies just west of the Interstate Bridge. Lined with premier restaurants and wine tasting rooms, Vancouver's new waterfront destination is anchored by the Grant Street Pier—a cable-stayed structure jutting 90 feet out over the Columbia River designed to resemble the billow of a passing sailboat.
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